Tag Archives: 9/11

United in Disaster

September 12, 2012 By Kendal Kuehler Ranger Reporter A historical day that should be remembered, a tragedy, a traumatic event for America, and a moment when the world stood still from the horror are the words from Amarillo College’s students that describe 9/11. It has been 11 years now since the terrorist attacks on 9/11, but not all memories of the day are as clouded as the dust in New York City from the collapse of the towers. The towers collapsed but America’s unity grew from the disarray. “That tragic event happened and all of us feel bad for those people. They’re Americans, we’re Americans, New Yorkers or Texans, it doesn’t make a difference,” said Doctor Farmer, Social Science Professor. The recorded casualties for that day are 2,993 people (including hijackers) and 8,900 injures. Worldwide 9/11 holds the highest casualty rate for a terrorist attack in a single day according to Wm. Robert Johnston website. Farmer thinks it is amazing, how almost everyone was virtually connected to somebody that they knew or were related someone that lost their life that day. During a disaster the United States set their differences aside and band together to form a stronger unity. “Common enemies make best friends,” said Ruth Lumpkin, an English major. Lumpkin pondered on the question of the unity of the nation and concluded that most of the time American citizens let their differences get in the way of the countries unity until a disaster. America became very patriotic after 9/11 supporting the country and making it more unified. In the time of a disaster things change, but as time passes people’s lives go back to normal. A tragic event 9/11 was, but now people believe it is just another day in history book. Lumpkin was in 3rd grade and doesn’t remember too much and Tremillo sees it as just another date when people became more alert and defensive. Farmer explained that America becoming more unified on 9/11 as a “natural human Read more [...]

Behind the lens

Firemen Rescue Team, October 11th, 2001 Printed on RC Paper, 29 x 39.75” All photographs copyright Joel Meyerowitz Courtesy of Joel Meyerowitz and Edwynn Houk Gallery This show is organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions
By Andrea Godoy There is a deliberateness in his images. A shadow is not there by accident or coincidence. The streaks of sweat that crisscross the subject’s face are noticeable because he wants them to be noticed. It’s as if the emotions captured on film transport the viewer to that specific point in time. Each picture tells a story; not just random snapshots, but an entire canvas is covered with one scene, each one more impressive than the last. Each is focused on the same theme. Aftermath. Joel Meyerowitz was the only photographer who was able to get access to Ground Zero immediately following the attacks of 9/11. His collection of large-format images was released to the public five years after the attack. Amarillo College’s Student Government Association, in partnership with the Amarillo Museum of Art, is hosting Meyerowitz’s collection for the first time in Texas. On Tuesday, the SGA hosted a lecture on Meyerowitz by AC photography instructor Rene West. “Meyerowitz did not stumble into the forbidden city,” West said. Like all artistic ventures, Meyerowitz followed a thought process to get the shot he wanted. “I wanted people to know who he was, not just see these pictures,” West said. Meyerowitz was introduced to photography when he was 10 years old, she said. He began his career as a photographer shooting “street photography.” In the early 1960s, he would attend parades and shoot members of the audience. West explained in her lecture that many street photographers would use that technique because they were able to become invisible. That invisibility would serve Meyerowitz well while he was photographing Ground Zero. “He had permission from politicians to be at the site, but never from the police,” West said. “They considered that area a crime scene and people consistently got kicked out.” Meyerowitz was determined to get the shots, however. He couldn’t just walk in with his camera. “He said he had to look Read more [...]

VIDEO: AC and AMOA host 911 Photography Exhibit

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On November 2, Amarillo College and the Amarillo Museum of Art celebrated the grand opening of “Aftermath: Images from Ground Zero”–

 

Uploaded: Wednesday, November 03, 2011

Institutional theme brings 9/11 to Amarillo

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Rare photographs of Ground Zero tour U.S., stop at AMoA By Linda Cortez The Amarillo Museum of Art is remembering the 10th anniversary of 9/11 through photographs and special events. AMoA launched the exhibition, “Aftermath: Images from Ground Zero/Photographs by Joel Meyerowitz,” Oct. 28. It will run through Dec. 31. The pictures “became property of the city museum of New York the year after the photographs toured internationally, and now on the 10-year anniversary they are touring the United States, and this will be the only Texas venue,” said Kim Mahan, AMoA deputy director. Joel Meyerowitz’s photos are the only existing photographic record of Ground Zero immediately after 9/11. After the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, the area was closed to other photographers. Little information is available about the activities in the guarded, enclosed area that was known as “the forbidden city.” Joel Meyerowitz became the only photographer to have access to the site. “The photographer was there for nine months and took all of these photographs,” Mahan said. Amarillo College photography instructor Rene West will give an overview of “Meyerowitz: Behind the Lens” at noon Tuesday. Along with the photos is a piece of steel that was recovered from the World Trade Center. The steel also will be on temporary exhibition. “The photographs and recovered steel from 9/11 really caught my emotions,” said Allie Dakat, a tourist from Riley, Kan. “I never realized how much destruction was caused until I started seeing the details in the photos.”   Published: Wednesday, November 03, 2011 Read more [...]